Fern's Picks

 

Fern Britton picks

Books really are one of life’s greatest pleasures. There is nothing I love more than reading a brilliant book, talking to my friends about it afterwards and passing it on to share the love. It’s also wonderful to hear from you too about what you love reading, and so I am tremendously excited to announce my new book club, Fern’s Picks, exclusively with the lovely people at Tesco.

I will be selecting my favourite books for you to enjoy, and I am delighted we are starting off this book club with a bang with some incredible reads from incredible authors. On each book there are also some lovely bookish extras to get the conversation started. I so hope you enjoy my Fern’s Picks – don’t forget to let me know what you think using #FernsPicks!

How Hard Can It Be by Allison Pearson

Kate Reddy is counting down the days until she is fifty, but not in a good way. Fifty, in Kate’s mind, equals invisibility. And with hormones that have her in shackles, teenage children who need her there but won’t talk to her and ailing parents who aren’t coping, Kate is in the middle of a sandwich that she isn’t even allowed to eat because of the calories.

She’s back at work after a big break at home, because somebody has to bring home the bacon now that her husband Rich has dropped out of the rat race to master the art of mindfulness. But just as Kate is finding a few tricks to get by in her new workplace, her old client and flame Jack reappears – complicated doesn’t even begin to cover it.

How Hard Can It Be? is a coming of age story for turning fifty. It’s about so much more than a balancing act; it’s about finding out who you are and what you need to feel alive when you’ve got used to being your own last priority. And every page will leave you feeling that there’s a bit of Kate Reddy in all of us.

Mother by Hannah Begbie

HER LOVE FOR HER DAUGHTER IS EVERYTHING. HER LOVE FOR HIM IS DEADLY.

Cath had twenty-five perfect days with her newborn daughter before Mia’s deadly illness was diagnosed.

As her life implodes, Cath’s despair drives her to a parental support group where she meets a father in a similar situation, the dangerously attractive Richard – charming, handsome and adamant that a cure for their children lies just over the horizon: everything Cath wants to believe.

Their affair – and the chance to escape reality – is unavoidable, but carries catastrophic consequences: the nature of Mia’s illness means that Cath’s betrayal endangers not just her marriage but the life of her baby.

Can she stop herself before it’s too late?

Last Letter

Last Letter from Istanbul by Lucy Foley

ISTANBUL, 1921

Before the Occupation, Nur’s city was a tapestry of treasures: the Grand Bazaar alive with colour, trinkets and spices; beautiful saffron sunsets and the sweet fragrance of the fig trees dancing on the summer breeze . . .

Now the shadow of war hangs over the city, and Nur lives for the protection of a young boy with a terrible secret. As she weaves through the streets, carrying the embroideries that have become her livelihood, she avoids the gazes of the Allied soldiers. Survival is everything.

When Nur chances upon George Monroe, a medical officer in the British Army, it is easy to hate him. Yet the lines between enemy and friend grow fainter. She and the boy would both be at risk. Nur knows that she cannot afford to fall – impossibly and dangerously – in love . . .